Reporting Category

Using Google Search Console to Improve Your SEO

When you work in digital marketing it’s hard not wish you could talk to Google. Wouldn’t that be nice? Imagine being able to ask questions and get feedback about your site.
Ok, so there’s no direct line to get in touch with Google’s algorithm, at least in part because bots are notoriously bad on the phone. But we do have Search Console. It’s not a helpline but it can facilitate some communication with Google.
In another post we talked about using Search Console for SEO analysis and reporting. But in addition to using the information in Search Console to make strategic decisions, you can actually use the interface to make immediate tactical changes.
In this post we’ll cover some of the features available in Google Search Console (GSC) that will help you influence how Google understands your site and improve your understanding of how Google is seeing your site.

 

Google Search Console for SEO

 

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Using Google Search Console for SEO Analysis and Reporting

Google Analytics (GA) is one of the most robust and accessible analytics platforms available in the digital world. Not to mention that a standard account is free. But in addition to the Analytics we all know and love, Google also has Search Console (GSC).
Google defines their Search Console as “a no-charge web service by Google for webmasters. It allows webmasters to check indexing status and optimize visibility of their websites.” So while GA allows for a deep dive into metrics for traffic acquisition and user behavior, GSC is more focused on the site’s relationship with Google.
That’s a complicated relationship for most of us. Depending on the day, we love Google, hate it, love to hate it or hate to love it. But for better or worse, Google is the largest search engine in the U.S. and much of the world. It’s also the single largest driver of traffic to most websites. For that reason, monthly digital reports can benefit from the insights that GSC provides.
Search Console is an extremely useful platform that allows you to perform meaningful analysis and make changes that can affect how Google crawls, indexes and understands your site content. But for now, we’ll focus on the analysis as it applies to reporting. Don’t worry though, we’ll cover updates and optimization in another post.

 

Google Search Console

 

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3 Ways to Make Your Analytics Reporting More Visual

Humans are often visual learners. In fact it’s been estimated that up to 65% of people are visual learners and assimilate information more easily using images, colors and other aids. The same source at the University of Alabama suggests:

“Visual aids add a new dimension to presentations. When used properly, they can help you to more effectively deliver your message by adding impact and interest.”

While this speaks specifically to students in a learning environment, it’s a good lesson for digital marketers too. Part of a marketer’s job, whether they work in-house or for an agency, is to help colleagues and clients to understand the effect of initiatives and to use data to locate insights and demonstrate results.
This job becomes much easier when visual components can be successfully integrated into regular reporting. In this article, we’ll go through some ideas for how you can make your digital reports more visually appealing and ultimately more effective.

 

Make Analytics Reports More Visual

 

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Analytics Vs. Reporting: Adding Insight to Data

When someone is speaking, do you simply hear them or are you truly listening?
Listening implies a conscious choice, an investment in the words being spoken. With digital data, some of the same principles apply. Month to month, are you providing analytics to your clients or are you truly reporting?
In the case of analytics versus reporting, analytics is the numbers, the raw data that is captured by a platform like Google Analytics. Whereas reporting indicates an interpretation of that data. It is an effort to extract insights that can drive decisions and actions. The ability to distinguish between the two, and provide the latter, is what can make or break your relationship with clients.
Sounds easy enough, right? Unfortunately, sometimes the closer you are to the analytics the harder it can be to see them through someone else’s eyes.
As an online marketer, it’s all too easy to assume that everyone understands the meaning inherent in the data you’re immersed in every day. Your comprehension of how the AdWords bidding system works or how Google crawls page content is second nature. So when you’re going through reports in Google Analytics and exporting spreadsheets full of information, you may operate in a bubble where you’re ready take action on the data without a translation.
For instance, you may see that a landing page has a high bounce rate and low conversion rate from ads. Instinctually, you know to adjust the content on the page. However, when presenting this to a client, will they understand what bounce rate and conversion rate are, how you determined those metrics were poor and why that made you decide to change the content? Not to mention, do they understand how those numbers relate to whether or not their business is making money from digital marketing?
In this article, we’ll cover a few tips for adding insight to your data to ensure that you’re providing valuable, thorough reporting and not just raw numbers.

 

Megalytic Chart of Organic Traffic

 

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Multiple Language Support (May 2017 Upgrade)

Megalytic has customers all over the world, many in countries where English is not the primary language. Many have been asking us to provide translation capabilities, so that they can create reports in the language preferred by their readers. As a result, I am extremely pleased to announce that we have just released Support for Multiple Languages.
The following languages are supported, with more to be added in the near future.

  • Arabic
  • Dutch
  • English
  • French
  • German
  • Hebrew
  • Italian
  • Portuguese
  • Spanish
  • Romanian
Megalytic users can set a default language for their reporting and override that default for individual reports. For example, a multi-national based in the UK can set their reports for English by default, but still publish reports for their European subsidiaries in German, French, Spanish, or Italian. Users can even create a report in one language (e.g., English), and publish in another (e.g., Arabic).
If you are interested in checking out these new language capabilities, sign up for a free 14-day trial and if you have any questions, feel free to submit a help request.

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