Facebook Ad Metrics You Should Care About

How can you tell if a Facebook campaign is effective? Is it how many eyes were on an ad? Is it how many people engaged? Or, how many people wound up on your website after seeing an ad? It could be any or all of the above. The level of success you achieve depends largely on your end goals. Your success in communicating the results depends on your ability to decipher Facebook metrics.
While that sounds simple enough, when you start looking at Facebook ad metrics, the options can quickly become overwhelming. When analyzing ad campaigns many digital marketers, familiar with other platforms like AdWords, may look for familiar metrics like clicks, impressions, and CTR (click-through rate). But Facebook has a system all its own.
At the time of writing, you can report on eight different types of clicks within the Facebook interface: Link Clicks, Unique Link Clicks, Outbound Clicks, Button Clicks, Clicks (All), Unique Clicks (All), Social Clicks (All), and Unique Social Clicks (All). For some of these click categories, you can also measure CTR (click-through rate) and CPC (cost per click).
You can see how the data can quickly get confusing, especially after looking at the long list of terms in Facebook’s glossary. How do you know what types of clicks (and other metrics) to include in your client reports?
In this article, we’ll review the most important metrics for Facebook ads, as well as how to relate those to client reporting efforts. Let’s start with clicks.

 

Facebook Ad Metrics You Should Care About

 

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Using Custom Channel Groupings in Google Analytics

Do you ever find yourself confused by some of the default names for metrics and dimensions in Google Analytics?
Do you ever wish you could take a closer look at the specifics of how users behave on your site based on how they got there?
No worries, you’re in good company on both counts.
Google Analytics contains an array of hidden secrets that allow you to slice and dice data in unique ways to meet your needs. In this article, we’ll touch on the names of metrics and dimensions and show you a method to customize channels in a way that is tailored to different types of traffic and marketing efforts.
Before diving in further, let’s start by defining some key Google Analytics terms.

Source indicates the origin of a visit, such as a domain (newyorker.com) or search engine (Google).

Medium indicates the broad type of traffic, such as organic (from non-paid search), cpc (from paid search), or email.

Channel indicates the higher level category of traffic defined by the combination of source and medium.

For more details on how Google Analytics categorizes traffic into channels, see our previous post about Understanding Google Analytics Channels.
In this article, we’ll delve further into customizing channel groupings to more accurately evaluate your data.

 

Google Analytics Custom Channel Grouping

 

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Multiple Language Support (May 2017 Upgrade)

Megalytic has customers all over the world, many in countries where English is not the primary language. Many have been asking us to provide translation capabilities, so that they can create reports in the language preferred by their readers. As a result, I am extremely pleased to announce that we have just released Support for Multiple Languages.
The following languages are supported, with more to be added in the near future.

  • Arabic
  • Dutch
  • English
  • French
  • German
  • Hebrew
  • Italian
  • Portuguese
  • Spanish
  • Romanian
Megalytic users can set a default language for their reporting and override that default for individual reports. For example, a multi-national based in the UK can set their reports for English by default, but still publish reports for their European subsidiaries in German, French, Spanish, or Italian. Users can even create a report in one language (e.g., English), and publish in another (e.g., Arabic).
If you are interested in checking out these new language capabilities, sign up for a free 14-day trial and if you have any questions, feel free to submit a help request.

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Reaching Users in Their Inboxes with Gmail Ads

Gmail, the email provider created by the search juggernaut Google, has over 1 billion monthly active users . Think about all of those people, checking their inboxes multiple times a day just waiting for a new message to arrive. What if your brand could use this massive user base to spread your message and attract new customers?
Good news! You can.
Gmail advertising allows you to show ads directly within your audience’s inbox, reaching people as they’re checking email throughout the day. Ads appear right above messages in a highly visible location, similar to an email subject line. You can put offers in front of people, when they are engaged, attracting clicks and sales without even having to actually send an email.
In this article, we’ll review how Gmail ads appear, how to create a campaign, and what tactics to use for the most effective targeting. Let’s start by looking at how Gmail ads show up in the inbox.

 

GMail Ads Blog Post

 

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Evaluating Digital Agency Billing Models

It takes a very special kind of person to enjoy managing money. It’s even rarer to find someone who enjoys asking people for money. But whether you love it or hate it, at the end of the day, an agency needs to bill clients in order to keep the lights on. Across the industry, opinions vary widely on the best approach to billing, especially when digital work can be difficult to “show” outside of a final report.
In this article, we’ll review four possible approaches to billing clients, along with their pros and cons:

  • Percentage of spend
  • Hourly
  • Flat Fee
  • Profit-Based

 

Agency Billing Humor

 

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